conservation

Stuart Pimm is awarded the Tyler Prize

Stuart Pimm is awarded the Tyler Prize

This morning sees the following announcement from Tyler Prize for Environmental Achievement website. “Two conservationists whose careers have centered on understanding ecosystem functions as the essential foundation for ecosystem restoration will share the 2010 Tyler Prize for Environmental Achievement. The award, consisting of a $200,000 cash prize and gold medals, will go to Dr. Laurie [...]

By March 9, 2010 1 Comments Read More →
Engaging conservationists through social media

Engaging conservationists through social media

The Neotropical Conservation Foundation provides a great example of how a conservation organization can use social media to engage its audience while at the same time meeting its own needs. The NCF wants a new logo. Rather than roll out a new logo fait accomplis, it posted ideas on its Facebook page and asked “Fans” [...]

By March 4, 2010 0 Comments Read More →
Suit Seeks to Protect 70,000 Additional Acres for Cape Sable Seaside Sparrow

Suit Seeks to Protect 70,000 Additional Acres for Cape Sable Seaside Sparrow

WASHINGTON— The Center for Biological Diversity and Florida Biodiversity Project filed suit today to obtain a larger protected area for the highly endangered Cape Sable seaside sparrow by reversing a Bush-era decision that struck down 70,000 acres of critical habitat identified by scientists as essential for the survival of the rare songbird. The lawsuit is [...]

By September 10, 2009 0 Comments Read More →
An Inordinate Passion for Tropical Moths

An Inordinate Passion for Tropical Moths

 National Geographic grantee Professor Roger Kitching wants to know how much less diversity there is in tropical rainforest that has been logged than in unlogged “primary” forest. He finds some clues from the moths he draws to his lamp, Stuart Pimm reports in words, images, and video from the field, deep in the Borneo jungle. [...]

By August 6, 2009 0 Comments Read More →
Going, Going,…

Going, Going,…

By Stuart Pimm, Doris Duke Professor of conservation ecology This century will surely be remembered as the time the Earth bit back—not that Mother Nature hadn’t been a little testy before now. In the fourteenth century, plague spread more easily as the population both grew and became more concentrated in urban areas. When Europeans began [...]

By June 9, 2009 Read More →
Florida Keys Shifting Baselines – Thoughts on World Oceans Day

Florida Keys Shifting Baselines – Thoughts on World Oceans Day

Since last December, we’ve been involved with a number of good friends in Key West, Florida, on a green initiative that includes the investigations of medicinal plants of the Florida Keys and northern Caribbean. Following from these interactions with students and colleagues at Duke University and in Key West itself, I had the good fortune [...]

By June 9, 2009 Read More →
Birding at the BioBlitz with Stuart Pimm

Birding at the BioBlitz with Stuart Pimm

By May 29, 2009 Read More →
Many Mammal Migrations Are at Risk of Extinction

Many Mammal Migrations Are at Risk of Extinction

By Stuart L. Pimm for NatGeo News Watch There’s an urgency to find quality food and water that forces many large mammals to migrate. A new study finds that human activities increasingly threaten their ability to do so. Photo of zebra migration by Stuart L. Pimm   read more >

By May 29, 2009 Read More →
Friday Cocktail: The Conflagration: Splash the G-Word, 1 Shot of Rainforest, Light My Fire & Pass the Ganga

Friday Cocktail: The Conflagration: Splash the G-Word, 1 Shot of Rainforest, Light My Fire & Pass the Ganga

As Steve Allen said: Do not allow children to mix drinks. It is unseemly and they use too much vermouth. Round 1: The G-word punched through the media membrane this week. Geoengineering. Big word for the headlines. Uttered by none other than John Holdren, Obama’s chief scientific adviser. He was referring to the possibility that [...]

By April 14, 2009 Read More →
Klimawandel betrifft Tierarten unterschiedlich stark

Klimawandel betrifft Tierarten unterschiedlich stark

Washington DC/Wien (pte/09.03.2009/15:45) – Nicht alle Tier- und Pflanzenarten werden von der Klimaveränderung gleich stark betroffen sein. Zu diesem Schluss kommt ein Forscherteam der Universität von Wisconsin-Madison http://www.wisc.edu und der University of Arizona im Fachmagazin Science. Einige der Spezies werden sich aufgrund schneller Evolution den neuen Gegebenheiten sehr rasch anpassen.  More >

By March 9, 2009 Read More →
Predicting diversity within hotspots to enhance conservation

Predicting diversity within hotspots to enhance conservation

IMAGE: This is the tree frog Hypsiboas semilineatus, common throughout the Atlantic rainforest of Brazil. Click here for more information.   Berkeley — With limited funding and an inadequate number of scientists, governments in countries containing “hotspots” of threatened biodiversity are wrestling with how to protect plants and animals in disappearing habitats. But a new [...]

By February 9, 2009 Read More →
Symposium tackles big question: how many species will survive our generation

Symposium tackles big question: how many species will survive our generation

An overview of the Smithsonian’s Symposium: “Will the rainforests survive? New Threats and Realities in the Tropical Extinction Crisis” Nine scientists dusted off their crystal balls Monday at the National Museum of Natural History in Washington DC, weighing in on the future of the world’s tropical forest. Despite the most up-to-date statistics, prognosis for the [...]

By January 19, 2009 Read More →
Species at the Brink – An interview with Stuart Pimm on NPR

Species at the Brink – An interview with Stuart Pimm on NPR

Stuart Pimm tracks extinction, from Madagascar to the Amazon to South Florida, and maybe your backyard. Out in the world where Cuban crocodiles and Indian tarantulas, Caspian seals and Florida panthers are in trouble. He tracks species one-by-one — panther by panther, antbird by antbird — in the Everglades and Brazilian rain forest. And he [...]

By November 12, 2008 Read More →
A Conversation With Stuart L. Pimm Asking ‘Why Do Species Go Extinct?’

A Conversation With Stuart L. Pimm Asking ‘Why Do Species Go Extinct?’

Alex di Suvero for The New York Times ‘I realized that extinction was something that as a scientist, I could study. I could ask, Why do species go extinct?’ – Stuart L. Pimm More from the NY Times >

By November 11, 2008 Read More →
Q&A: Paul Ehrlich

Q&A: Paul Ehrlich

INTERVIEW: The Stanford biologist behind The Population Bomb and The Dominant Animal discusses the frog problem, environmental evangelicals, and Chinese population control. more >

By October 31, 2008 Read More →
Europe and Arnold clamp down on toxic chemicals

Europe and Arnold clamp down on toxic chemicals

Hundreds of chemicals likely to be identified by the European Union (E.U.) as “substances of very high concern” are produced throughout the U.S., sometimes in large quantities. In fact, chemicals such as varieties of plastic-softening phthalates—linked to developmental and reproductive problems because they mimic hormones—are produced in excess of hundreds of million of pounds per [...]

By October 2, 2008 Read More →
Ecuador grants rights to nature – September 29, 2008

Ecuador grants rights to nature – September 29, 2008

They didn’t cast a single vote, but Ecuador’s monkeys, tortoises (pictured) and orchids just acquired constitutional rights, along with the rest of the nation’s nature. On Sunday, Ecuador’s human citizens voted their approval of a new constitution; reports vary but approximately two-thirds of people voted yes (New York Times). The document included language making Ecuador [...]

By October 2, 2008 Read More →
A new law of nature

A new law of nature

Ecuador next week votes on giving legal rights to rivers, forests and air. Is this the end of damaging development? The world is watching The South American republic of Ecuador will next week consider what many countries in the world would say is unthinkable. People will be asked to vote on Sunday on a new [...]

By October 2, 2008 Read More →
An Interview with Lyle Estill

An Interview with Lyle Estill

Discussing his new book Small is Possible, Piedmont Biofuels and sustainability in general.

By September 9, 2008 Read More →
Drilling for Oil Way, Way Offshore

Drilling for Oil Way, Way Offshore

Time Magazine – U.S. – August 18, 2008 Going Green Drilling for Oil Way, Way Offshore By BRYAN WALSH Anyone who ever doubted the centrality of oil and natural gas to the global economy should have been convinced by the political events of the past few months. INCLUDES AUDIO PODCAST INTERVIEW WITH WESTERN AMAZON PAPER [...]

By August 31, 2008 Read More →